Students look at medical careers at JRMC

a1kidstourcolorOriginally published in The Jamestown Sun, 4/11/13
By: Keith Norman

Photos by John M. Steiner

Students from Edgeley and Kulm elementary schools were given patients to care for Wednesday at Jamestown Regional Medical Center. The students, dressed in scrubs, disinfected the patients and vaccinated them and before performing lab tests.

The patients are not expected to recover.

The goal was not to improve health of the “patients” — oranges, actually — but to build interest for careers in health care.

“The goal is to introduce kids at a young age to the medical professions,” said Kylie Nissen, senior project coordinator for the University of North Dakota Center for Rural Health. “We want them to come back to the rural areas and work down the road.”

The program is called the Rural Collaborative Opportunities for Occupational Learning in Health, abbreviated as “R-COOL-Health.” The program provides grants to hospitals and schools to bring classes to the hospital for a day of hands-on learning.

“A lot of these kids only know about doctors and nurses,” Nissen said. “This expands their knowledge about medicine and all the jobs it entails. PT (physical therapy) is a big attraction especially to those into sports. There is not a single health profession that doesn’t have shortages in North Dakota.”

Nissen said this is the fifth year of the program with 10 grants provided to schools around the state.

The grant provides scrub-like shirts for the students and staff attending and helps cover the costs of syringes and oranges for the hospital demonstrations.

Tony Hanson, administrator of LaMoure County Public Health, said the program was about the future.

“It is about developing careers for the young kids,” he said. “It is a grass roots effort but really the only way we’ll fill our staffing needs in rural health.”

Hanson said the setting and instructions increases the benefit of the program.

“Doing things hands on — like giving a shot to an orange — gives them a chance to experience and learn,” he said.

The program comes at an ideal time in the child’s education, according to Jason Carroll, sixth grade teacher from Edgeley.

“Some of these kids only see a hospital when someone is sick or injured,” he said. “This lets them look at health care from a different perspective. The sixth-grade age is where kids start asking about occupations. Most start out wanting to be a pro athlete but it is a good idea to get them thinking about other professions.”

Some of the students were already sold on the medical field.

Sixth-grader Lucas Nitschke, Jud, N.D., said he was already considering becoming a doctor.

“I enjoy learning about health care,” he said. “Learning about it helps me to see if it’s something I want to do.”

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Maren Berntson, a fifth-grader from Kulm, said she enjoyed learning about all the different jobs in healthcare.

“I think I would like physical therapy because it is helping people to recover,” she said.

Abby Wald, a registered nurse with Lamoure County Public Health, said the students were good learners.

“It gives them a glimpse of what we do,” she said. “Maybe it will inspire some people to go into the health field. Besides the orange is a good patient for them to work with.”

Sun reporter Keith Norman can be reached at 701-952-8452 or by email at knorman@jamestownsun.com

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Polar Pig Raises $19,000 for Hospice

Origianally published in the Jamestown Sun on February 04, 2014
By Kari Lucin, The Jamestown Sun

A beauty queen, a firefighter, superheroes, clowns, kids and a giant parrot all leaped into water on a snowy day to earn $19,000 for Jamestown Regional Medical Center’s hospice program Saturday in the Polar Pig — Walk the Plank fundraiser.DSC_4697

“That’s the biggest amount of money we’ve ever made for them, and we’ve been doing it for seven years,” said Jan Wiese, treasurer of the Jamestown HOG Chapter that organizes the annual fundraiser. “We were very pleased with that.” Sixteen people jumped into the heated water to benefit hospice, as snowflakes fell and HOG members set off fireworks, simulating cannon fire.

Each jumper then had to brave the 13-degree air to get back into the Stutsman Harley-Davidson building, changing out of soaking-wet costumes to warm back up.

“It was warm in there, but it was cold getting out,” said MacKenzie Johnson of Jamestown.

Johnson, who earned the title of Miss North Dakota Junior High, jumped into the water wearing a teal formal gown and a tiara, after raising $130 for JRMC Hospice.

Dennis Sand, also known as “Fluffy the Parrot,” wore a parrot costume and face paint for his jump.

As soon as Sand cannonballed into the water, the costume filled with water, making it difficult for Sand to stand up again.

“It’s just a good time, and it’s for a good cause,” Sand said. “It was great. It really was a lot of fun.”

He and the Jamestown Clowns raised $1,020 for JRMC Hospice.

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Members of the Kaiser family made the watery hop together — first Cruze Kaiser, 6, followed by his father, Chad Kaiser, who held out his arms to his daughter, Mia, 4, who wore pink goggles, a purple tutu and matching purple shoes for her jump.

Before the event began, Mark Wiese, director of the local HOG group, said he hoped to exceed the previous year’s total of $17,000.

In addition to the plankwalking, the event also included a chili cook-off featuring a wide variety of chilis. Most seemed to have beans, but some had chicken or even olives as ingredients.

Then there was a silent auction, with cocktail sets, purses, gift baskets, salon products, live plants, framed oil paintings, a 1997 Pontiac Grand Prix and a set of two cheery lawn gnomes outfitted in Harley Davidson gear.

Fats and oils: The bad and the better

By: Joan Enderle, America Heart Association

All fats are not bad. In fact, dietary fats are essential to give your body energy and to support cell growth. They also help protect your organs and help keep your body warm. Fats help your body absorb some nutrients and produce important hormones, too. Your body definitely needs fat – but not as much fat as most people eat.

There are four major dietary gats in the foods we eat: saturated fats, trans fats, monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats. The four types have different chemical structures and physical properties. The bad fats, saturated and trans fats, tend to be more solid at room temperature (like a stick of butter), while the better fats: monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fasts tend to be more liquid (like liquid vegetable oil).

All fats are energy-dense so consuming high levels of fat – regardless of the type – can lead to taking in too many calories. Consuming high levels of saturated or trans fats can also lead to heart disease and stroke. Health experts generally recommend replacing saturated fats and trans fats with monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats – while still limiting the total amount of fat you consume.

Eating foods with a moderate amount of fat is definitely part of a healthy diet. Just remember to balance the amount of calories you eat with the amount of calories you burn. Aim to eat more vegetables, fruits whole-grain/high-fiber foods, fat-free and low-fat dairy products, lean meats, poultry, and fish (at least twice a week). Doing so means that your diet will be low in both saturated fats and trans fats.

Many people wonder how many calories they should consume each day or how many grams of fat is healthy. The American Heart Association recommends that about 25-35 percent of your daily calories come from fats. Less than 7 percent of calories from saturated fat and less than 1 percent from trans-fat is recommended. Most of the fats you eat should be monounsaturated and/or polyunsaturated fats.

Visit the American Heart Association’s “My Fats Translator” at http://www.myfatstranslator.org to get your personalized daily consumption limits for total fat, saturated fat and trans-fat. Just input your age, gender, height, weight and physical activity level.

Here’s a list of cooking oils that contain the best ratio of the “better-for-you” fats.
Canola oil was first introduced in the 1970s for home cooking and is made from seeds of the canola plant. It’s a great oil to have in your pantry because it is very versatile. Works well for sautéing, baking, frying, marinating and salad dressings.

Olive oil is a heart healthy staple of the Mediterranean diet and is made from ripe olives. “Extra virgin” is made from the first pressing of olives. “Light” olive oil is lighter in flavor and color but has the same amount of calories as extra-virgin. With a distinct flavor best uses include: grilling, sautéing, roasting, spreads for bread, base for Italian, Greek and Spanish dishes.

Peanut oil is made from shelled peanuts and is popular in Asian dishes as well as Southern cooking. With a high smoke point, peanut oil is used commonly for stir-frying, roasting, deep-frying or baking.

Sesame oil is made from sesame seeds and is a staple in Chinese, Korean and Indian cooking. With a nutty flavor, the light is used for stir-frying and the dark for dressings/sauces.

Vegetable oil is usually made from a combination of corn, soybeans and/or sunflower seeds and is another great oil to have on hand because it can be used for many different cooking techniques, including sautéing, baking, frying, marinating and salad dressings.

This article is brought to you by the American Heart Association’s Simple Cooking with Heart Program. For more articles and simple, quick and affordable recipes, visit heart.org/simplecooking.

Enderle is the communications and Go Red director in North Dakota for the American Heart Association.

JRMC U: Home Health

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Join us on Wednesday, January 16 at 12:00 p.m. for a free educational forum on home health and hospice. This forum is part of the “JRMC U” education series and will be hosted by the home health and hospice team. With seven consecutive years of the HomeCare Elite award, the home health and hospice team will share how they can provide quality care and enhance quality the of life for patients. A free, light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to 701-952-4796 as space is limited.

Physical Activity vs. Exercise

“I don’t understand. I am busy and active with tasks all day long, but I just can’t seem to lose any weight.”

A common misconception is that physical activity and exercise are one and the same. While these terms are often used interchangeably, there is a very important difference in the purpose and outcomes.

Physical activity is defined as the process of exerting energy for a task. Exercise is physical activity that is planned, structured and repetitive for the purpose of conditioning the body. Exercise is prolonged physical activity that is of a higher duration than typical daily tasks.

Many of us get physical activity during working hours or at home with chores. During this time the heart rate is increased above the resting state, but only for a few minutes. We work hard for a short interval followed by rest, allowing the heart rate to lower again. Incorporating this type of physical activity into your day is encouraged and beneficial. However, when it comes to a goal of improving cardiovascular health or weight management, your body needs planned and structured exercise.

According to the American College of Sports Medicine, adults are to accumulate 150 minutes of moderate intensity exercise each week. An example of this would be to ride a bike for 30 minutes for days per week. It is also acceptable to accumulate this in short 10-minute bouts throughout the week. More exercise, 300 minutes per week, is recommended to improve health status or to reduce body weight.

Adults should also incorporate resistance training to improve muscular strength and endurance. Increased lean muscle tissue boosts the metabolism so that the body burns more calories even in the resting state. Strong muscles allow you to more easily complete regular daily activities, reduce fall risk and create an appearance of a toned body.

The annual New Year, New You community wellness challenge begins Monday. Get your co-workers, friends, or family together and form a team to compete within our community for a healthier lifestyle. The challenge is a great opportunity to start or support your current personal wellness plan through motivation, accountability, variety and education.

Registration information can be found at http://www.jrmcnd.com or call the Jamestown Regional Medical Center Wellness Center at 701-952-4891 for details.

Pulmonary Rehabilitation Now Offered at JRMC

Jamestown Regional Medical Center (JRMC) is excited to announce their new service, pulmonary rehabilitation. Pulmonary rehabilitation allows patients to make the most of limited lung function.

“Pulmonary rehab aims to reduce symptoms, decrease disability and increase participation in physical and social activities while improving the overall quality of life for patients with chronic respiratory disease,” said Emily Kjelland, JRMC registered clinical exercise physiologist and cardiopulmonary rehab manager.

This new service is designed for adults who are increasingly limited in their everyday activities due to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Emphysema, Chronic Bronchitis, Sarcoidosis and other lung conditions. Pulmonary rehab can improve a patient’s ability to function and increase their quality of life. Some benefits that pulmonary rehab can provide are: reduce and control breathing difficulties, increase functionality for daily activity, reduce dependence on medical resources and much more.

A signed referral from your doctor is required for participation in the pulmonary rehab program at JRMC. The referral and other information regarding your physical condition links the pulmonary rehab team to the patients physician, allowing them to work together to provide the best possible care. For more information on pulmonary rehab at JRMC call (701) 952-4839.

JRMC Home Health Receives National Recognition

Jamestown Regional Medical Center (JRMC) Home Health has been named to the 2012 HomeCare Elite list. This list is a compilation of the most successful home care providers in the United States.

HomeCare Elite names the top 25 percent of home health agencies based on the performance measures of quality of care, quality improvement, patient experience, process measure implementation and financial management.

JRMC Home Health is one of the two home health agencies in the state to receive this recognition. It is the only agency in the state that has received this acknowledgement for seven consecutive years.

“I want to take this opportunity to give our deepest gratitude to the past and present Home Health patients and their families for their generosity to allow JRMC Home Health to come into their homes. Your support and dedication to our programs – Home Health, Private Duty and Lifeline plays an important role in our success and it is greatly appreciated,” stated Trisha Jungles RN, Home Health and Hospice manager.  “It is our privilege to be able to provide care and services to Jamestown and the surrounding communities.”

To learn more about home health services at JRMC go to www.jrmcnd.com or call (701) 952-4847.