JRMCU: Direct Access Testing

jrmcu4x4_DAT_ColorJoin Jamestown Regional Medical Center (JRMC) on Wednesday, June 19 at 12:00 p.m. for a free educational forum on Direct Access Testing in the Laboratory. This forum is part of the “JRMC U” education series and will be hosted by Mary Bowder, JRMC laboratory manager.

Direct Access Testing provides lab testing at the convenience of the patient. Patients can order certain laboratory tests (mostly screening type tests) without the order of a physician. Lean more at the free monthly educational seminar about this new service at JRMC.

A free, light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to 701-952-4796 as space is limited.

JRMC Announces New Vice President of Clinical Services

trishajJamestown Regional Medical Center (JRMC) is pleased to announce that Trisha Jungels has been named as the Vice President of Clinical Services/Chief Nursing Officer.

“Trisha has shown wonderful leadership skills in her time at JRMC and we are excited for her to take over this new role.” stated Todd Hudspeth, JRMC CEO.

Jungels is a 2002 nursing graduate of Jamestown College and has served as the JRMC Home Health and Hospice manager since 2009. She is also the organizational excellence coordinator for JRMC. Trisha was a staff nurse and unit supervisor at JRMC and a home health nurse for Ransom County Public Health in Lisbon.

Trisha will oversee all nursing units at JRMC including the patient care unit, emergency department, family birthplace and surgical services, home health/hospice, pharmacy, anesthesia, cardiopulmonary rehab/wellness, social services/utilization review and clinic services.

Students look at medical careers at JRMC

a1kidstourcolorOriginally published in The Jamestown Sun, 4/11/13
By: Keith Norman

Photos by John M. Steiner

Students from Edgeley and Kulm elementary schools were given patients to care for Wednesday at Jamestown Regional Medical Center. The students, dressed in scrubs, disinfected the patients and vaccinated them and before performing lab tests.

The patients are not expected to recover.

The goal was not to improve health of the “patients” — oranges, actually — but to build interest for careers in health care.

“The goal is to introduce kids at a young age to the medical professions,” said Kylie Nissen, senior project coordinator for the University of North Dakota Center for Rural Health. “We want them to come back to the rural areas and work down the road.”

The program is called the Rural Collaborative Opportunities for Occupational Learning in Health, abbreviated as “R-COOL-Health.” The program provides grants to hospitals and schools to bring classes to the hospital for a day of hands-on learning.

“A lot of these kids only know about doctors and nurses,” Nissen said. “This expands their knowledge about medicine and all the jobs it entails. PT (physical therapy) is a big attraction especially to those into sports. There is not a single health profession that doesn’t have shortages in North Dakota.”

Nissen said this is the fifth year of the program with 10 grants provided to schools around the state.

The grant provides scrub-like shirts for the students and staff attending and helps cover the costs of syringes and oranges for the hospital demonstrations.

Tony Hanson, administrator of LaMoure County Public Health, said the program was about the future.

“It is about developing careers for the young kids,” he said. “It is a grass roots effort but really the only way we’ll fill our staffing needs in rural health.”

Hanson said the setting and instructions increases the benefit of the program.

“Doing things hands on — like giving a shot to an orange — gives them a chance to experience and learn,” he said.

The program comes at an ideal time in the child’s education, according to Jason Carroll, sixth grade teacher from Edgeley.

“Some of these kids only see a hospital when someone is sick or injured,” he said. “This lets them look at health care from a different perspective. The sixth-grade age is where kids start asking about occupations. Most start out wanting to be a pro athlete but it is a good idea to get them thinking about other professions.”

Some of the students were already sold on the medical field.

Sixth-grader Lucas Nitschke, Jud, N.D., said he was already considering becoming a doctor.

“I enjoy learning about health care,” he said. “Learning about it helps me to see if it’s something I want to do.”

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Maren Berntson, a fifth-grader from Kulm, said she enjoyed learning about all the different jobs in healthcare.

“I think I would like physical therapy because it is helping people to recover,” she said.

Abby Wald, a registered nurse with Lamoure County Public Health, said the students were good learners.

“It gives them a glimpse of what we do,” she said. “Maybe it will inspire some people to go into the health field. Besides the orange is a good patient for them to work with.”

Sun reporter Keith Norman can be reached at 701-952-8452 or by email at knorman@jamestownsun.com

JRMC Auxiliary Meets for April Meeting

The JRMC auxiliary held their monthly meeting on April 1 with Alice Williams presiding in president Carolyn Exner’s absence.

JRMC CEO Todd Hudspeth addressed the group announcing that a new foundation director had been hired. The VA will move into their new clinic space located in the Jamestown Clinic Building in late April.

The 25 members in attendance voted to pay $8,000 toward their $70,000 pledge to JRMC Foundation leaving a balance of $12,000.

The volunteer recognition dinner will be held on April 23.

A number of members will join delegates Sandy Hill and Linda Greer at the Hospital Auxiliary of North Dakota convention on May 16 in Mandan.

The gift shoppe is planning an open house for the public and hospital employees on May 6 from 3:00 – 7:00 p.m. to introduce new products acquired at market recently.  The open house will include tasting of food products available in the shoppe.

Patient Safety Awareness Week

PSAW2013-graphic-for-webJamestown Regional Medical Center is observing Patient Safety Awareness week this week, March 3rd – 9th, 2013.

Medication safety and health care culture and safety are the focus of Patient Safety Awareness Week. This year’s theme, Patient Safety 7/365, reminds health care professionals and health consumers that providing safe patient care requires constant dedication and effort, 365 days a year. At JRMC we are dedicated to working together with our patients to provide the safest care possible.

Patient Safety Awareness Week is an annual education and awareness campaign for health care safety led by the National Patient Safety Foundation, NPSF.

It is important to focus on patient safety all year round and recognize the work being done to improve health safety worldwide. This requires a constant effort, 365 days a year.

JRMC is proud of the work that each of our staff does to make JRMC a leading health care provider in our community.

National Cardiac Rehab Week

Cardiac Rehab Week
February 10th – 16th

Cardiac RehabThis week is National Cardiac Rehabilitation Week! This week JRMC would like to recognize the cardiac rehab department for the hard work that they do for their patients. Each day the cardiac rehab department helps people with heart disease recover faster from recent heart related events.

To learn more about the cardiac rehab department, plan to attend the JRMC U: Heart Health on Wednesday, February 20th at noon. Please RSVP at ext. 4796.

Thank you to the JRMC Cardiac Rehab staff for your contribution in helping improve the health and physical performance of patients at risk for or diagnosed with heart disease.