JRMC Receives VHA Leadership Award for Clinical Excellence

VHA Inc., a national health care network, has given Jamestown Regional Medical Center (JRMC) a 2013 VHA Leadership Award for Clinical Excellence, honoring the hospital for achieving national performance standards for clinical quality, safety and patient experience.

VHA is a national network of more than 1,350 not-for-profit hospital systems and 72,000 non-acute facilities that work together to achieve new levels of clinical performance and operational efficiency.

JRMC was one of 40 VHA member hospitals this year to receive a Leadership Award for Clinical Excellence. Winners were announced May 1 during VHA’s national meeting, the 2013 Navigating to Excellence Forum, held in Las Vegas.

The VHA Leadership Award for Clinical Excellence recognizes organizations that achieve top performance in care measures tracked by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Winners are selected based on a composite score consisting of three elements: 1) Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Total Performance Score, which includes Core Measures and the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Services (HCAHPS) survey results; 2) 30-day readmission rates; and 3) Medicare cost data.

As part of this year’s awards program, VHA recognized 10 of the 40 organizations with HEN Improvement Leadership Awards in honor of their commitment to CMS’ Partnership for Patients initiative and their active involvement in VHA’s Hospital Engagement Network. HEN participants commit to reduce select Hospital-Acquired Conditions by 40 percent and preventable readmissions by 20 percent over a three-year period. Winners in this category showed substantial improvement on their baseline performance measures in at least one of 10 patient safety areas of focus.

“I would like to take this opportunity to thank the JRMC Clinical Team.  Their commitment to clinical excellence in patient care and outcomes allows our organization to live out its vision and values,” stated Trisha Jungels, chief nursing officer at JRMC. “Our vision is to be the best rural hospital in the country for patients to receive care, employees to work and providers to practice.”

 

“The leaders and staff in these organizations have shown their dedication to providing not only consistently high levels of clinical care but also continually improving that performance to produce better outcomes for their patients,” said Steve Miff, PhD, VHA’s senior vice president for Clinical and Care Delivery Solutions. “Since the passing of the Affordable Care Act in 2010, the health care industry has moved quickly to establish and meet performance quality metrics and align care protocol. We are especially proud of these VHA organizations for exceptional performance against national key indicators.”

By recognizing institutions for their commitment and achievements, VHA hopes that other health systems will apply these leading practices in their own organizations to further enhance the overall level of quality in our nation’s health care system.

National Sun Safety Week

It’s National Sun Safety Week! We would like to remind you to block the sun, not the fun. According to the Sun Safety Alliance, sun exposure leads to many health concerns, including aging and potentially cancer, yet only about 20% of Americans use sunscreen daily. This week, remember the importance of protecting yourself from the harmful rays of the sun. Find out if you are getting too much sun from the photo below.

Sun_Safety

JRMCU: Joint Injections for Pain Management

jrmcu4x4_painInjectionsCOLOR_webJoin Jamestown Regional Medical Center (JRMC) on Wednesday, May 15 at 12:00 p.m. for a free educational forum on joint injections for pain management.  This forum is part of the “JRMC U” education series and will be hosted by JRMC Radiologist, Dr. Reddy.

Steroid injections into major joints like the hip or shoulder can help patients who suffer from acute or chronic joint and back pain. Injections into the spine can reduce inflammation to help reduce pain, tingling, numbness and other symptoms caused by nerve inflammation.

Through joint injections in the JRMC Radiology department, patients do not have to live with pain any longer. A free, light lunch will be provided. Please RSVP to 701-952-4796 as space is limited.

JRMC Announces New Vice President of Clinical Services

trishajJamestown Regional Medical Center (JRMC) is pleased to announce that Trisha Jungels has been named as the Vice President of Clinical Services/Chief Nursing Officer.

“Trisha has shown wonderful leadership skills in her time at JRMC and we are excited for her to take over this new role.” stated Todd Hudspeth, JRMC CEO.

Jungels is a 2002 nursing graduate of Jamestown College and has served as the JRMC Home Health and Hospice manager since 2009. She is also the organizational excellence coordinator for JRMC. Trisha was a staff nurse and unit supervisor at JRMC and a home health nurse for Ransom County Public Health in Lisbon.

Trisha will oversee all nursing units at JRMC including the patient care unit, emergency department, family birthplace and surgical services, home health/hospice, pharmacy, anesthesia, cardiopulmonary rehab/wellness, social services/utilization review and clinic services.

JRMC Announces New Foundation Director

Lisa_JcropJamestown Regional Medical Center is pleased to announce that Lisa Jackson has been named as the JRMC Foundation Director.

“Lisa has great experience in working with non-profit organizations and we look forward to her taking our Foundation to the next level.” stated Todd Hudspeth, JRMC CEO.

Jackson graduated from NDSU with a degree in mass communications and has worked in marketing with Newell Rubbermaid, annual giving and events for Jamestown College and major gift and gift planning for Kansas University Endowment. She is the co-founder of GivingPoint, a fundraising consulting firm and helped launch Today’s Giving, a philanthropy magazine. Most recently, she has been an independent fundraising and communication coach to area non-profits. She has a two year old daughter, Hadley and is married to Dustin.

Lisa will be responsible for planning, organizing and implementing strategies to achieve successful development of the Foundation.

JRMC Gift Shoppe Open House

openHousePostewebrJoin us on Monday, May 6th for an open house at the JRMC Gift Shoppe located in near the main entrance of the hospital. Enjoy new items, gifts and food samples. All funds raised in the Gift Shoppe are donated back to JRMC.

Bring a non-perishable food item and your name will be placed in a drawing for door prizes. All donated goods will go to the Jamestown Food Bank.

JRMC Holds Volunteer Recognition Banquet

On Tuesday, April 24th we held our Volunteer Recognition Banquet in coordination with National Healthcare Volunteer Week.  JRMC thanks the many men and women who donate over 6,500 hours to JRMC a year. Each one of them that makes the difference in the lives of those we serve.
vol_ofyear
Shirley Flieth who was recognized as the 2012 Volunteer of the Year. Shirley donated over 500 hours to JRMC this past year. Congratulations!

Students look at medical careers at JRMC

a1kidstourcolorOriginally published in The Jamestown Sun, 4/11/13
By: Keith Norman

Photos by John M. Steiner

Students from Edgeley and Kulm elementary schools were given patients to care for Wednesday at Jamestown Regional Medical Center. The students, dressed in scrubs, disinfected the patients and vaccinated them and before performing lab tests.

The patients are not expected to recover.

The goal was not to improve health of the “patients” — oranges, actually — but to build interest for careers in health care.

“The goal is to introduce kids at a young age to the medical professions,” said Kylie Nissen, senior project coordinator for the University of North Dakota Center for Rural Health. “We want them to come back to the rural areas and work down the road.”

The program is called the Rural Collaborative Opportunities for Occupational Learning in Health, abbreviated as “R-COOL-Health.” The program provides grants to hospitals and schools to bring classes to the hospital for a day of hands-on learning.

“A lot of these kids only know about doctors and nurses,” Nissen said. “This expands their knowledge about medicine and all the jobs it entails. PT (physical therapy) is a big attraction especially to those into sports. There is not a single health profession that doesn’t have shortages in North Dakota.”

Nissen said this is the fifth year of the program with 10 grants provided to schools around the state.

The grant provides scrub-like shirts for the students and staff attending and helps cover the costs of syringes and oranges for the hospital demonstrations.

Tony Hanson, administrator of LaMoure County Public Health, said the program was about the future.

“It is about developing careers for the young kids,” he said. “It is a grass roots effort but really the only way we’ll fill our staffing needs in rural health.”

Hanson said the setting and instructions increases the benefit of the program.

“Doing things hands on — like giving a shot to an orange — gives them a chance to experience and learn,” he said.

The program comes at an ideal time in the child’s education, according to Jason Carroll, sixth grade teacher from Edgeley.

“Some of these kids only see a hospital when someone is sick or injured,” he said. “This lets them look at health care from a different perspective. The sixth-grade age is where kids start asking about occupations. Most start out wanting to be a pro athlete but it is a good idea to get them thinking about other professions.”

Some of the students were already sold on the medical field.

Sixth-grader Lucas Nitschke, Jud, N.D., said he was already considering becoming a doctor.

“I enjoy learning about health care,” he said. “Learning about it helps me to see if it’s something I want to do.”

a2jrmckidsbw

Maren Berntson, a fifth-grader from Kulm, said she enjoyed learning about all the different jobs in healthcare.

“I think I would like physical therapy because it is helping people to recover,” she said.

Abby Wald, a registered nurse with Lamoure County Public Health, said the students were good learners.

“It gives them a glimpse of what we do,” she said. “Maybe it will inspire some people to go into the health field. Besides the orange is a good patient for them to work with.”

Sun reporter Keith Norman can be reached at 701-952-8452 or by email at knorman@jamestownsun.com

Polar Pig Raises $19,000 for Hospice

Origianally published in the Jamestown Sun on February 04, 2014
By Kari Lucin, The Jamestown Sun

A beauty queen, a firefighter, superheroes, clowns, kids and a giant parrot all leaped into water on a snowy day to earn $19,000 for Jamestown Regional Medical Center’s hospice program Saturday in the Polar Pig — Walk the Plank fundraiser.DSC_4697

“That’s the biggest amount of money we’ve ever made for them, and we’ve been doing it for seven years,” said Jan Wiese, treasurer of the Jamestown HOG Chapter that organizes the annual fundraiser. “We were very pleased with that.” Sixteen people jumped into the heated water to benefit hospice, as snowflakes fell and HOG members set off fireworks, simulating cannon fire.

Each jumper then had to brave the 13-degree air to get back into the Stutsman Harley-Davidson building, changing out of soaking-wet costumes to warm back up.

“It was warm in there, but it was cold getting out,” said MacKenzie Johnson of Jamestown.

Johnson, who earned the title of Miss North Dakota Junior High, jumped into the water wearing a teal formal gown and a tiara, after raising $130 for JRMC Hospice.

Dennis Sand, also known as “Fluffy the Parrot,” wore a parrot costume and face paint for his jump.

As soon as Sand cannonballed into the water, the costume filled with water, making it difficult for Sand to stand up again.

“It’s just a good time, and it’s for a good cause,” Sand said. “It was great. It really was a lot of fun.”

He and the Jamestown Clowns raised $1,020 for JRMC Hospice.

DSC_4704

Members of the Kaiser family made the watery hop together — first Cruze Kaiser, 6, followed by his father, Chad Kaiser, who held out his arms to his daughter, Mia, 4, who wore pink goggles, a purple tutu and matching purple shoes for her jump.

Before the event began, Mark Wiese, director of the local HOG group, said he hoped to exceed the previous year’s total of $17,000.

In addition to the plankwalking, the event also included a chili cook-off featuring a wide variety of chilis. Most seemed to have beans, but some had chicken or even olives as ingredients.

Then there was a silent auction, with cocktail sets, purses, gift baskets, salon products, live plants, framed oil paintings, a 1997 Pontiac Grand Prix and a set of two cheery lawn gnomes outfitted in Harley Davidson gear.

Fats and oils: The bad and the better

By: Joan Enderle, America Heart Association

All fats are not bad. In fact, dietary fats are essential to give your body energy and to support cell growth. They also help protect your organs and help keep your body warm. Fats help your body absorb some nutrients and produce important hormones, too. Your body definitely needs fat – but not as much fat as most people eat.

There are four major dietary gats in the foods we eat: saturated fats, trans fats, monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats. The four types have different chemical structures and physical properties. The bad fats, saturated and trans fats, tend to be more solid at room temperature (like a stick of butter), while the better fats: monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fasts tend to be more liquid (like liquid vegetable oil).

All fats are energy-dense so consuming high levels of fat – regardless of the type – can lead to taking in too many calories. Consuming high levels of saturated or trans fats can also lead to heart disease and stroke. Health experts generally recommend replacing saturated fats and trans fats with monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats – while still limiting the total amount of fat you consume.

Eating foods with a moderate amount of fat is definitely part of a healthy diet. Just remember to balance the amount of calories you eat with the amount of calories you burn. Aim to eat more vegetables, fruits whole-grain/high-fiber foods, fat-free and low-fat dairy products, lean meats, poultry, and fish (at least twice a week). Doing so means that your diet will be low in both saturated fats and trans fats.

Many people wonder how many calories they should consume each day or how many grams of fat is healthy. The American Heart Association recommends that about 25-35 percent of your daily calories come from fats. Less than 7 percent of calories from saturated fat and less than 1 percent from trans-fat is recommended. Most of the fats you eat should be monounsaturated and/or polyunsaturated fats.

Visit the American Heart Association’s “My Fats Translator” at http://www.myfatstranslator.org to get your personalized daily consumption limits for total fat, saturated fat and trans-fat. Just input your age, gender, height, weight and physical activity level.

Here’s a list of cooking oils that contain the best ratio of the “better-for-you” fats.
Canola oil was first introduced in the 1970s for home cooking and is made from seeds of the canola plant. It’s a great oil to have in your pantry because it is very versatile. Works well for sautéing, baking, frying, marinating and salad dressings.

Olive oil is a heart healthy staple of the Mediterranean diet and is made from ripe olives. “Extra virgin” is made from the first pressing of olives. “Light” olive oil is lighter in flavor and color but has the same amount of calories as extra-virgin. With a distinct flavor best uses include: grilling, sautéing, roasting, spreads for bread, base for Italian, Greek and Spanish dishes.

Peanut oil is made from shelled peanuts and is popular in Asian dishes as well as Southern cooking. With a high smoke point, peanut oil is used commonly for stir-frying, roasting, deep-frying or baking.

Sesame oil is made from sesame seeds and is a staple in Chinese, Korean and Indian cooking. With a nutty flavor, the light is used for stir-frying and the dark for dressings/sauces.

Vegetable oil is usually made from a combination of corn, soybeans and/or sunflower seeds and is another great oil to have on hand because it can be used for many different cooking techniques, including sautéing, baking, frying, marinating and salad dressings.

This article is brought to you by the American Heart Association’s Simple Cooking with Heart Program. For more articles and simple, quick and affordable recipes, visit heart.org/simplecooking.

Enderle is the communications and Go Red director in North Dakota for the American Heart Association.